NMTESOL Open Board Meeting Invitation – May 19th, 2018

Dear NMTESOL:

NMTESOL in its present-day iteration has been around since 2008. In these 10 years, we have held numerous state-wide conferences as well as local workshops, produced a regular newsletter, greeted foreign visitors, and even have begun a professional journal.

Currently, the organization is suffering from a decline in membership and as a result, participation and leadership. We were unable to enlist anyone to fill several open Board positions. There will be added vacancies by the end of the year. We seek to restructure the organization to better reflect and meet the needs of the membership, but we will be unable to move forward without leadership on the Board and member ownership. This ownership will allow the professionals of New Mexico to have an International TESOL affiliate organization. In order to do so, we are opening up our board meetings to members, starting in May.

Our first open board meeting will be on May 19th, 2018 at 2 PM. Click this link to join: https://hangouts.google.com/group/Q8LIgRH6hRvqCGrs2

The New Mexican immigrant, refugee, and indigenous second language learner communities continue to have a profound need for various services including English language instruction. While the number of certified ESL teachers in New Mexico has been reduced due to declining state funding, the number of instructors and tutors who serve ESL students in our state remains high.

We would like to continue to support the state with professional development opportunities and want to engage those in the classroom to help us define what those opportunities look like.

By opening up the meeting to members, we hope to meet some specific goals. Goals of the first meeting include:

  • defining and promoting leadership opportunities
  • soliciting service and participation to keep the organization alive and moving forward

If you cannot attend on the 19th, please send your comment and ideas by Friday, May 18th to nmtesol at gmail dot com.

We look forward to your attendance and contributions.

Sincerely,

NMTESOL Board
Amy Zhupikov, Vice-President
Dean Sundberg, Treasurer
Penny Mortier, Secretary
Ruth Cisneros, Newsletter Editor

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The project, a study by researchers at the University of Washington, followed children for five years, either grades one through five or three through seven. It looked at their reading and writing activities at home, their school progress and their skills, both according to their parents’ reports and according to annual assessments.

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One of the most notable identifiers of someone whose primary language is not English is speaking with an accent. While accents vary in English in different countries — and even by region within those countries — for most native speakers it is easy to tell if someone learned English later in life.

Interestingly, there are many people who spoke a language other than English as a child, learned English and now have native pronunciation in English. This generally occurs when people learn English (or another language) early in their life or during childhood.

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Many teachers are seeking ways to better help their English language learner students, who often have additional challenges to overcome. These students are learning English alongside all the content standards, and some have had their education disrupted by life transitions. The challenges that face them are many, but there are strategies to help them develop language and academic skills.

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In her Fircrest Elementary School classroom, 7-year-old Yana Koroteyev is buried in books.

Her favorite, she says, pulling one from the stack on her desk, is “Elephant and Piggie,” a book series by Mo Willems. She flips quickly through an edition of the animal friends’ adventures, reading aloud as Elephant and Piggie prepare for a party.

“Party! Party! Party! Party!” she reads, running her fingers across the words on the page, giggling at the dancing animals.